Exclusive Video Interviews

We'll be bringing you video interviews with musicians who've collaborated with Peter Gabriel over his long career as a musician. In these interviews, we'll solicit and ask questions submitted by you, and learn more about the creative decision making and collaborative processes behind Peter Gabriel's music.

Kevin Killen

Kevin Killen is a music producer, engineer, and mixer. His work has been recognized by multiple awards and nominations, and he has worked with a range of recording artists including Shakira, Peter Gabriel, U2, Elvis Costello, Kate Bush, Jewel, Bon Jovi and Shawn Colvin. Kevin will share experiences as the audio engineer behind Peter Gabriel's legendary So album, taking us behind the scenes to the recording processes behind hit songs Sledgehammer and In Your Eyes.

Jerry Marotta

Jerry Marotta is a world class drummer and producer who has worked with Peter Gabriel, Paul McCartney, Sarah McLachlan, and countless others. Hes also recently taken over a phenomenal recording facility called DREAMLAND and is touring the Security Project playing the music of Peter Gabriel live. Jerry collaborated with Peter between 1977 and 1986 and will provide insights into his experiences performing, recording and collaborating with Peter.

Larry Fast

Larry Fast is best known for his series of pioneering electronic music albums recorded under the project name SYNERGY. He is also known for his work with Peter Gabriel; playing synthesizer on records and on tour, and rounding out the production team on many of Peter's albums for nearly a decade. Larry will reflect back on his collaborations with Peter, especially related to the creative use of synthesizer and audio technologies in recording and live performance.

Module One: Getting Started

Learn to listen to music critically

  • Finding a quiet space to listen
  • Understanding and optimizing your music playback equipment
  • Determining the upper and lower frequency limits of your headphones and speakers
  • Finding your Crew at Play With Your Music

Module Two: Critical Listening: Timbre & Space

Choose a song to analyze

  • Identify instruments and timbres
  • Place sounds in spatial field (left-right, front-back)
  • Describe timbral qualities
  • Repetition: listen to song in Infinite Jukebox
  • Video lecture and Q&A: On Space and Timbre as Creative Dimensions of Music

Module Three: Recording Analysis: Musical Structures

Analyze for Musical Structure

  • Listen for form along timeline
  • Label sections
  • Count beats and measures
  • Separate musical layers
  • Identify when timbres enter and exit within the mix
  • Annotate interesting aspects of the recording
  • Video lecture and Q&A: On Musical Structure in Songwriting

Module Four: Deconstructing and Reconstructing a Mix

Work with #PWYM Mix tool

  • Reconstruct a mix from the stereo recording
  • Manipulate balance, pan, mute and solo
  • Share convergent mix with your learning ensemble
  • Create a creative mix, and share with your learning ensemble
  • Video lecture and Q&A: On the Multitrack Production Process

Module Five: Creative Audio Effects in the DAW

Add effects to a dry mix in Soundation

  • Overview of common audio effects
  • Basics of reverb, delay, EQ, & compression
  • Dragging and dropping clips
  • Copy and paste
  • Looping
  • Sample-based production, hip-hop and dance music
  • Copyright and ownership
  • Exporting and sharing your mixes to Soundcloud
  • Video lecture and Q&A: On the Musical Uses of Effects in Recorded Music

Module Six: Remixing with MIDI in the DAW

What is MIDI?

  • Compare and contrast audio and MIDI
  • Compare and contrast music notation and MIDI
  • The piano roll: working with MIDI

Editing MIDI

  • Drawing and deleting notes
  • Copy and paste within the piano roll
  • Copy and paste in the multitrack view
  • Remix techniques
  • Video lecture and Q&A: On Creative Approaches to Computer and Electronic Music

Module Seven: Remixing it All Together

Remixing in the DAW

  • Take given multitrack (audio and MIDI) and create a new version
  • Share on SoundCloud
  • Peer critique
  • Iterate and refine the mix, re-upload
  • Vote on best mixes

Bouncing and sharing your mix: audio formats and fidelity

  • Mono vs stereo
  • Sampling rate and bit depth; the CD red book standard
  • Data compression: Why is it necessary? MP3 (128K vs 320K), AAC, streaming
  • Video lecture and Q&A: DIY Home Recording Strategies on a Budget/i>

Reflection and documentation

  • What went right with your remix?
  • What do you want to improve?
  • What still doesn’t make sense?

Where to from here?

  • Free software: Audacity, Garageband
  • Non-free software: Pro Tools, Logic, Ableton, Reason
  • Basics of audio recording: mics, preamps and interfaces
  • Learning resources

ARCHIVED INTERVIEWS

For each module of the course, we've invited faculty and staff from the NYU Steinhardt Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions, as well as other luminaries in the field of music production and audio education for video interviews to supplement the learning materials in Play With Your Music.

MODULE 1

Alex Case - On Space and Timbre as Creative Dimensions of Music

Alex Case has dedicated his professional life to the study of aesthetics, perception, signal processing, electro-acoustics and room acoustics for the creation and enjoyment of recorded music.An Associate Professor of Sound Recording Technology, Case leads classes, sessions and research with undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. An active member of the Audio Engineering Society, and a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America, Case is an engineer, educator, and author who speaks frequently on audio and acoustics across the United States and worldwide. With degrees in Mechanical Engineering, Music, and Acoustics, Professor Case lives and works at the intersection of art and science.

MODULE 2

Phil Galdston - On Musical Structure in Songwriting

Phil Galdston s a songwriter/producer whose work has appeared on nearly 70 million records worldwide, in recordings by artists ranging from Celine Dion to Sheryl Crow, from Aaron Neville to Beyoncé, from Brandy to Esperanza Spalding. Among his many successes is Save the Best For Last, recorded by Vanessa Williams, which simultaneously topped Billboard's three major charts, was nominated for a GRAMMY® as Song of the Year, and was ASCAP's Song of the Year. Phil is the recipient of the Grand Prize of the American Song Festival, the Time For Peace Award, two Nashville Songwriters' Association citations, Cable ACE and DOVE Award nominations, four ASCAP awards, and five GRAMMY® nominations. His work has appeared on fourteen GRAMMY®- nominated or winning recordings. He speaks on intellectual property rights and is an active member of both ASCAP and The Recording Academy. He was Songwriter-in-Residence at the Berklee College of Music and was appointed the first member of the Songwriting Faculty at NYUSteinhardt and the first Faculty Songwriter-in-Residence in NYU’s history. He is the curator, and moderator of the SONGWRITERS HALL OF FAME MASTER SESSIONS AT NYU and co-curates/moderates the Steinhardt School’s FRIDAY@1, a weekly series of conversations with luminaries in music.

MODULE 3

Paul Geluso - On the Multitrack Production Process

Paul Geluso’s work focuses on the theoretical, practical and artistic aspects of sound recording and reproduction. He is a sound recordist, mixer, and engineer who collaborates with musicians and media artists using sound as a creative medium. He has worked in many areas of sound and music production being credited as engineer, producer, composer, and musician on CD and 5.1 surround sound DVD releases in addition to film, video, sound installation, performance and broadcast television soundtracks since 1992. He is currently developing new ways to capture, mix, and process 3D audio for playback on multi-channel sound systems. This work will be presented at the 131st Audio Engineering convention in New York City. Prior to being full-time faculty at NYU, he taught classes in music production and technology at Bard College and the Peabody Institute in addition to directing the Stephen F. Temmer Tonmeister Seminar here at NYU. Geluso received a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from New Jersey Institute of Technology in 1988 and a Master of Music in Music Technology from New York University in 2000.

MODULE 4

Alex Case - On the Musical Uses of Effects in Recorded Music

Alex Case has dedicated his professional life to the study of aesthetics, perception, signal processing, electro-acoustics and room acoustics for the creation and enjoyment of recorded music.An Associate Professor of Sound Recording Technology, Case leads classes, sessions and research with undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. An active member of the Audio Engineering Society, and a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America, Case is an engineer, educator, and author who speaks frequently on audio and acoustics across the United States and worldwide. With degrees in Mechanical Engineering, Music, and Acoustics, Professor Case lives and works at the intersection of art and science.

MODULE 5

Tae Hong Park - On Creative Approaches to Computer and Electronic Music

Tae Hong Park is a composer, music technologist, and bassist. His work focuses on composition of electro-acoustic and acoustic music, machine learning and computer-aided music analysis, research in multi-dimensional aspects of timbre, and audio digital signal processing. Dr. Park has presented his music at national and international conferences and festivals including Bourges, ICMC, MATA, SCIMF, and SEAMUS. Among the ensembles and performers that have played his work are the Brentano String Quartet, California E.A.R. Unit, Edward Carroll, Ensemble Surplus, Zoe Martlew, Nash Ensemble of London, and the Tarab Cello Ensemble. Professor Park is author of Introduction to Digital Signal Processing: Computer Musically Speaking (World Scientific, 2010). He is the Chief Editor of Journal SEAMUS, serves as Editiorial Consultant for Computer Music Journal, and is President of the International Computer Music Association (ICMA). He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University.

MODULE 6

Amar Lal - On DIY Home Recording on a Budget

Amar Lal is a Master of Music in Music Technology candidate in the Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. He is a guitarist with the band Big Ups and co-runs a Brooklyn-based DIY record label ECB&B.